Thursday, February 23, 2012

Bewick's Wren

The Bewick's Wren is a rather small brown bird with a fondness for underbrush and scrubby foliage. Given these physical aspects of the bird, one might not expect much in way of personality. However, their incessant calling and singing and active bouncing is as bold as the bird's strong white eyestripe.


They flit about their business, gleaning insects and other teeny edibles. They're industrious little birds, and they fill the air with their constant chatter, no doubt complimenting and criticizing their fellow birds with equal energy.


They may not be an aesthetic feast for the eye, at least compared to some of the finches, nuthatches, and seedeaters with which they sometimes keep company, but they're lots of fun. Like all birds they manifest a certain beauty in their precise form and functioning as a species. One may not look at the Bewick's Wren and think, "Wow what a stunner!"But there is something undeniably beautiful about watching the camouflaged Wren running and bobbing about, using its tail to keep balance while it forages for food with its decurved beak. That's something everyone can appreciate.

14 comments:

  1. They may not be much to look at?? I think they are pretty cute!! But it's their vocalizations that always engage me into following them along through the scrubs!! Great post. You are such an excellent writer!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Karen. I think they're pretty cute too. As you said, they're much more often heard before they're seen, and it's reassuring to know these busy birds carry on their adventures in the undergrowth. I'm always surprised by how often a bird-less area turns out to be quite birdy indeed, it just takes some time to find the Wrens.

      Delete
  2. I'm quite fond of all the wrens and find them quite adorable. I don't see the Bewicks often enough. Thanks for this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Carole. I've fond of the Wrens too, and it's always a treat to get a good open look at these sly birds. The Cactus Wren is almost too exposed of course, but it's almost in a group of its own. Almost. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  3. I was amazed at how vocal they were down in the places we were birding last weekend. They are occasionally seen in Idaho and Utah, but I've missed them. It was so good to get reacquainted with the Bewick's Wren...even if I didn't get any photos of the buggers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was surprised too; they were pleasant companions throughout the day. I didn't get top-drawer shots but I kinda like the second frame.
      I guess you were saving your photo skills for that Green Heron. I'm still gushing about those photos, they're great.

      Delete
    2. I'm generally a terrible photographer, but I get lucky now and then. And sometimes I do really focus on the photography part of birding. When I am out a big day type of trip, I usually don't spend a lot of time focusing on photography much. I'll take whatever I get and what comes easily, but I go right back into listing mode.

      Delete
    3. I know the sentiment. I have trouble maintaing the necessary patience to get consistently good shots, but I'm working on it. Birding in a place like Patagonia...well that's just too overwhelming anyway.

      Delete
  4. I've seen this guy in several areas today. They are a lot of fun to watch.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice! You must've been on quite the romp.

      Delete
  5. What a wonderful little Wren Laurence!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're charming. I don't see that many Wren photos coming out from Antelope Island. How do they do up there?

      Delete
  6. My Bewick's wrens are my favorite. I've gone outside to set out some crumbled suet and had one fly in an arc halfway around me, singing its joy at the breakfast offerings. They flip themselves around by the tail like a cartoon character and absolutely charm me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're balls of energy aren't they? There are few birds whose wily antics compare to that of the Wrens, and the Bewick's is a fine specimen indeed. I don't see them too much in Phoenix (in fact, never within the city), so it's still a great treat every time one pops up on a hike or something and reminds me of its charming existence.

      Thanks for stopping by Alison.

      Delete